Yahoo! Podcast Mystery

I’ve got no idea how this happened. But I noticed that Yahoo! Podcasts were starting to send people to Crackunit. So I traced the link back and found this page: iain tait | crackunit.com – Episode Page on Yahoo! Podcasts

It looks like I’ve set up a Podcast for this content, which I haven’t. And I’d be scared of doing so for copyright reasons. Especially when they’ve added a ‘download (it’s free!)’ link.

Big record labels take note, it wasn’t me, it was Yahoo! what done it, honest. Anyone got any clues on how this might have happened? It looks like Yahoo! are scraping (in the nicest possible way) for podcastable content and sticking it into their directory…

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Turn Yahoo RED and Raise Money

Yahoo amex

American Express RED are trying to rasie £10k to fight AIDS in Africa today. All you have to do is click on a banner on the front page of Yahoo.co.uk (and it doesn’t even take you anywhere!). Each click raises 25p.

Click here to do it! (31st May only)

And the fun bit, once they hit £10k the homepage of Yahoo.co.uk turns red. (May only be available to UK IP addresses).

Confession – I may have had something to do with this (sorry).

UPDATE: We did it, hooray! See below.

We did it - turned the Yahoo! home page red

More on Participation

the 72:1.8 ruleFollowing on from the earlier post about people participating in communities I thought this post contained some great stats: The 1% Rule: Charting citizen participation. Points to the fact that 1% of Yahoo! Group members start groups and 10% of visitors ‘synthesize’ (or interact) with that content. On Wikipedia 1.8% of users have submitted 72% of the content.

The 72:1.8 rule isn’t as catchy as the 80:20 rule. But at the same time when people start banging on about user generated content it’s always handy to have some numbers like this in the back pocket. Read more.

Longtail Recommendations

long tail on last fmSupersmart Ged (who I know from Yahoo!) pointed me to the longtail recommendations engine on last.fm. I’d been to the page but I’d never noticed the slider: have a play, it’s really good (you might need to be a user to access it). It’s a really good and simple way to demonstrate in real terms the notion of ‘long tail’ to someone who hasn’t ever seen it before.

And on the topic of all things with long tails, Chris Anderson‘s book about it is on pre-order at Amazon now.

RSS what?

marketing sherpa logo
According to a report from Marketing Sherpa:

Currently at least 75 million consumers and businesspeople in the USA and UK use RSS on a regular basis. However, depending on which study’s stats you believe, only 17-32% of RSS users actually know they’re using RSS.

I don’t find this at all hard to believe. I use RSS all the time, lots of people I know use RSS, but without knowing what RSS actually is or how it works. Before trying to write a definition of RSS I did about 10 minutes of fruitless searching, attempting to find a definition that you didn’t have to be a techie to understand. I couldn’t. I’m sure that there are simple definitions out there. But all the ones I found tended to stray off into scary things like XML definitions.

Having tried (and in most instances failed) to tell clients about RSS feeds the most useful description of RSS I’ve found is something like this:

“Using RSS you can make your website content very portable. It takes the most important information: titles, text, links and images. And makes it easy for you, or other people to display it in the way they choose. An RSS feed enables people to view your site content on their phone, on their computer, on other websites (MyYahoo, Google personal home page, etc.). It gives you extra distribution channels for your content with almost no extra effort.”

That’s the fundamentals (as I see them). Of course there’s loads more you can do with RSS, but as a basic description this sort of works for me. If my dummies definition misses lots of important things please let me know.

Videos From the Googleplex

Google have released a heap of videos from their internal archives:

In addition to helping distribute content from across the world, Google would like to share videos featuring our company.

Some great stuff in there, especially the ever-brilliant Seth Godin doing a presentation that seems to cover the central themes of a selection of his books in under 50 minutes. I saw Seth present years ago when he was at Yahoo! and he’s always stuck in my mind as one of the most natural and compelling presenters out there.
Visit Videos From the Googleplex

FON backed by Skype and Google

Yahoo News Story details how Skype, Google and a load of the usual VC suspects are backing FON. FON is a startup that aims to create a global community of wi-fi sharers. Members are either Bills (who charge a small amount for access) or Linuses (who just share for free). There were a couple of startups doing this previously and I don’t know where they are now. At least these guys have got some cash in their pockets