QR Codes – There’s More

semacodes as branding device

Following earlier posts about QR codes (or Semacodes) – the barcodes that your phone can translate into cool stuff – thought I ought to post this from the MIT Advertising Lab on uses for QR codes.

I can’t help but think that the ones above look like some kind of freakomatic 60s Haight Ashbury throwback though.

Via IF from PSFK

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Semacode Update

Blogs are great. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. I asked a question about semacodes on websites. Went to bed. Then I woke up and someone’s left me a great answer. It’s like a big huge collective brain that goes on thinking throughout the night ;-)

Anyway, thanks Roger for some great thoughts. In fact if this is a topic that interests you, you should head over to his blog ‘All About Mobile Life‘ – which incidentally is QR code enabled ;-)

He makes a great point about QR Codes being used like RSS feeds. You can just snap a picture of the code on a site and boom, you’ve got a subscription to the site on your phone. Or a ‘takaway’ version of the site. Or simply a bookmark. So yes, I can see the point of codes on websites now.

I guess I’m just a bit behind in my cross-device behaviour at the moment.

And James from Collaborate Marketing has chimed in with:

The codes are also used for promotional offers – like coupons. So maybe Nike are saying – take this along to a store or some other Nike event. Also, in Japan the phones have special readers to take the information from screens, posters or instore, which we don’t have yet. I understand Nokia are testing them on the N-series.

Also a very valid use for these codes.

I guess in both examples it’s about transportability. In the ‘olden days’ people would have printed stuff out, now your mobile is easier to carry about than piles of paper (for some of us).

Interactive Cinema Ads

Brazillian interactive cinema ad for Fiat using text messages. More details on the MIT Advertising Lab blog

Interesting idea, and something we’ve had discussions about before. But I always felt it was really irresponsible to do something in cinemas using mobile phones. And a bit odd too. When I go into a cinema the first thing I do is turn my phone off. Even before I get into the screen. So to turn it back on again to text an advert, only to have to turn it off again straightaway feels like a chore. Be really interesting to know what the response rates are like.

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Sony Ericsson and Blogger/Google

sony ericcson w950Sony Ericsson are adding Blogger support and Google Search to their new phones – nice tie-up for all concerned I reckons. Scheduled for Q2 this year.

Some nice views of the new Sony Ericsson handsets on their Cebit 2006 site. My current favourite is the W950.

Directions on your iPod

Ipod directionsMash-up alert, it’s not perfect, but an interesting service combo nonetheless. Get directions onto your iPod (video, photo or nano). http://www.ipodiway.com/. Unfortunately is US and Canada only (for now).

Mobile Marketing

Yesterday I spoke at the Mobile Marketing 2005 conference. I actually quite enjoyed it which surprised me.

It was a tricky old thing. From speaking to lots of people later it’s obvious that there’s a lot of different levels of knowledge and experience within the sector. And there’s still a lot to play for. Which is inspiring.

What’s less inspiring is quite how ‘old media’ a lot of the thinking in the industry seems to be. Especially from the network operator side. It’s almost as if the web and open source hasn’t even registered. The networks (and a load of ‘feeder’ companies around them) seem to want to control and own everything. Their value chain seems to rely on them owning and delivering content. Much like a properly old-school ISP.

Is it really economically impossible for a network to detach itself from all their ‘value added services’? I hate using that term (especially when the services in question add no discernible value in my world). If I was offered a network that just charged a data rate but let me go where I wanted, using whatever device I wanted, I’d be in like a shot. And hoovering up mobile bandwidth. They may not get me paying 50p to watch a movie trailer from them (I would absolutly never do such a thing by the way). But they would get the data charges.

Or am I just being naive?

Until they sort themselves out I’m hoping for a massive wi-fi cloud and using VOIP on mobile wi-fi devices. Fuck the mobile networks. (Note to mobile networks (especially any of our clients): I didn’t really mean that completely).